Modelling clay

A nonhardening substance used for modeling sculptures. It is plastic (in the sense of being workable). It cannot be used for permanent work (unlike ceramic water-based clays, it is never fired or glazed). Although it becomes less useful as its oil either dries or is absorbed from it (making it brittle) or as it picks up impurities, it can be reused for many years if kept relatively clean. Even new it can vary greatly in quality. Most common varieties are made of clay mixed with petroleum greases, oils (typically linseed oil), turpentine, sulfur dioxide, and pigments. It softens as it is modeled by the hands (because of their warmth). Pieces are joined to each other by pressing them together and blending with fingertips. Equipment that might be used with modeling clay include modeling tools and armatures. Molds can be made from modeling clay. There are numerous commercially produced types, including the brand named Plasticine. It is sometimes called model clay. (Artlex.com)

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