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Hawk's House
table, bird's eye view, aerial map, geography, geology, furniture, ceramics, prairie landscape, core samples, architectural, archeology, anthropology, ecology, land, place, stoneware, soil, past, present, future, survey, sculpture, mixed media, 3 dimensional, satellite image, scientific, space, pyramid, biodome earth
description
Hawk's house is trying to represent the prairie landscape in a new way that shows aspects of the past, the present and the future in the same piece.
-- Lorne Beug

In this  sculptureA three-dimensional work of art, or the art of making it. Such works may be carved, modeled, constructed, or cast. Sculptures can also be described as assemblage, in the round, and relief, and made in a huge variety of media. A sculptor is one who creates sculptures. (artlex.com)  by Lorne Beug, we see a small table covered with  ceramicPottery or hollow clay sculpture fired at high temperatures in a kiln or oven to make them harder and stronger. Types include earthenware, porcelain, stoneware, and terra cotta. (Artlex.com)  shards that represent the bird’s-eye view of the prairie landscape. The table top is flat like the land and while it shows natural land forms it also shows the lines and marks imposed on it by man. The table legs are covered with  clayMud; moist, sticky dirt. In ceramics, clay is the basic material, usually referring to any of a certain variety of mixtures of such ingredients — fine-grained, firm earthy material that is plastic when wet, brittle when dry, and very hard when heated. There is a temperature with ceramic clays at which their particles fuse (vitrification), and this is most commonly controlled by heating (firing) them in a kiln. The most common types of ceramic clays are earthenware (terra cotta when fired, terra cruda when not), stonewares, and porcelain. (Artlex.com)  beads and they represent core samples of the layers of rock that have formed as the earth has developed over many hundreds of thousands of years. The glass and metal  formIn its widest sense, total structure; a synthesis of all the visible aspects of that structure and of the manner in which they are united to create its distinctive character. The form of a work is what enables us to perceive it. Form also refers to an element of art that is three-dimensional (height, width, and depth) and encloses volume. For example, a triangle, which is two-dimensional, is a shape, but a pyramid, which is three-dimensional, is a form. Cubes, spheres, ovoids, pyramids, cone, and cylinders are examples of various forms. Also, all of the elements of a work of art independent of their meaning. Formal elements are primary features which are not a matter of semantic significance — including colour, dimensions, line, mass, medium, scale, shape, space, texture, value; and the principles of design under which they are placed — including balance, contrast, dominance, harmony, movement, proportion, proximity, rhythm, similarity, unity, and variety. (Artlex.com)  covering the table has an architectural format and protects the  surface(an element of art) The outer or topmost boundary or layer of an object. Colours on any surface are determined by how incident rays of light strike it, and how a surface reflects, scatters, and absorbs those rays. The material qualities of a surface, as well as its form and texture further determine how it is seen and felt. (artlex.com) See also texture.  of the table.

Beug explores a variety of ideas in his artwork and while he often uses  imageryAn image is a picture, idea, or impression of a person, thing, or idea; or a mental picture of a person, thing, or idea. The word imagery refers to a group or body of related images. (Artlex.com)  from the prairie landscape as a starting point, he also references his interests in archaeology, anthropology, psychoanalysis, ecology, architecture and geology. In addition, Beug combines ideas related to time in many of his works as he often suggests the past, the present and the future.

Anne Suche comments on Beug’s representation of time in his  sculptureA three-dimensional work of art, or the art of making it. Such works may be carved, modeled, constructed, or cast. Sculptures can also be described as assemblage, in the round, and relief, and made in a huge variety of media. A sculptor is one who creates sculptures. (artlex.com)  Hawk’s House, “the unglazed forms at the bottom invariably represent the underground and the past; the  glazeA term used in ceramics to describe a thin coating of minerals which produces a glassy transparent or colored coating on bisque ware. Typically applied either by brushing, dipping, or spraying, it is fixed by firing the bisque ware in a kiln. This makes the surface smooth, shiny, and waterproof. Also, a glaze can be a thin, translucent or transparent coat over a painting, sometimes meant simply to protect the paint underneath, but more often to add a veil of colouration to an area of a picture. (artlex.com)  represents the past and the present; and the glass and metal extensions - continuums of the ceramics, but on a higher technological note -- symbolize the future.” (Suche, 1987)

additional resources Guide Book to a Ghost Town
Duration: 1:44 min
Size: 7397kb
Hawk's House Description
Duration: 1:22 min
Size: 6343kb
How He Got Started as an Artist
Duration: 1:47 min
Size: 8589kb
Interview with Timothy Long - Funk Art and the Regina Clay Movement
Duration: 3:35 min
Size: 15193kb
The Reason He Called it Hawk's House
Duration: 0:55 min
Size: 4231kb
Why the Table Shape
Duration: 1:55 min
Size: 8882kb
Things to Think About
  • In this work, Hawk’s House, we have a "bird's eye" view of the land. It has the point of view of an aerial photograph or a satellite image. Go to Google Earth and view your location from a satellite image. How is your place different from his?  How is it similar to his?
  • Beug uses his tile forms on the surface of the "table" to reveal the beauty of the prairie lands and the relationship of the organic landforms to the geometric roads and boundaries. Find out more about Saskatchewan's boundaries and determine if they are based on natural formations. What is a correction line and why is it necessary in mapping? How were Canadian boundaries established?
  • If you divided the table into three parts, legs, tabletop and glass dome, what might they suggest?
Studio Activity

Satellite images

Beug’s Hawk’s House is shown from the point of view of an aerial photograph or a satellite image.

  • Find the satellite image of your own home or neighbourhood using Google Earth, and reproduce it in a unique way to say something important about you and the place you live.

Tables

  • Do some preliminary sketches or designs for your own unique table or chair.
  • If interest and time allows, build this model into a life-size chair or alter and decorate an existing chair or table.

Future home

Design a home for the future.

References

Ball, Denise.  ‘Lorne Beug’s work is down-to-earth.’  The Regina Leader Post, November 1, 1980.

Beug, Lorne.  Beugography.  Unpublished document, 2002.

Beug, Lorne.  ‘Artist Statement.’  in Lorne Beug: Artists with Their Work.  Exhibition catalogue.  MacKenzie Art Gallery, Regina, Saskatchewan, 1985.

Hryniuk, Margaret.  ‘A different look at the vast Regina plains.’  Regina Sun, April 3, 1988.

Manning, Leslie.  ‘New Directions in Clay.’  Vanguard, Vol.13 #1, Feb. 1984.

Moppett, George.  Interview with Lorne Beug about his exhibit, Glass Architecture/Cultured Stones. Mendel Art Gallery, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, 1987.

Rosenberg, Ann.  ‘Vancouver: Lorne Beug.’  Art Magazine, Vol. 9 No. 38/39, 1978.

Suche, Anne.  ‘Lorne Beug.’  Western Living. August, 1987.

Whyte, Jon.  ‘Ceramic Sculpture: Another Dimension.’  Arts West. Vol. 5 #4, July/August 1980.

Whyte, Jon.  ‘Illusion and Simile in Western Sculpture.’  Art Magazine, June 1979.

Ylitalo, Katherine.  New directions in Clay.  Exhibition catalogue.  Peter Whyte Gallery, Banff, Alberta, 1983.

Zepp, Norm.  Lorne Beug: Artists with Their Work.  Exhibition catalogue.  MacKenzie Art Gallery, Regina, Saskatchewan, 1985.

Canadian Heritage University of Regina Mackenzie Art Gallery Mendel Art Gallery Sask Learning