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High Space Colour
airbrush, acrylic painting, spacious, spontaneous, line and colour, non-objective, lean, Regina Five, abstract expressionism, Emma Lake workshop, large-scale painting, illusion of space, curvilinear, line, atmospheric,
description

The  paintingWorks of art made with paint on a surface. Often the surface, also called a support, is either a tightly stretched piece of canvas or a panel. How the ground (on which paint is applied) is prepared on the support depends greatly on the type of paint to be used. Paintings are usually intended to be placed in frames, and exhibited on walls, but there have been plenty of exceptions. Also, the act of painting, which may involve a wide range of techniques and materials, along with the artist's other concerns which effect the content of a work. (Artlex.com)  High  SpaceSpace can be the area around, within or between images or elements. Space can be created on a two-dimensional surface by using such techniques as overlapping, object size, placement, colour intensity and value, detail and diagonal lines.   ColourProduced by light of various wavelengths, and when light strikes an object and reflects back to the eyes. Colour is an element of art with three properties: (1) hue or tint, the colour name, e.g., red, yellow, blue, etc.: (2) intensity, the purity and strength of a colour, e.g., bright red or dull red; and (3) value, the lightness or darkness of a colour. When the spectrum is organized as a color wheel, the colours are divided into groups called primary, secondary and intermediate (or tertiary) colours; analogous and complementary, and also as warm and cool colours. Colours can be objectively described as saturated, clear, cool, warm, deep, subdued, grayed, tawny, mat, glossy, monochrome, multicolored, particolored, variegated, or polychromed. Some words used to describe colours are more subjective (subject to personal opinion or taste), such as: exciting, sweet, saccharine, brash, garish, ugly, beautiful, cute, fashionable, pretty, and sublime. Sometimes people speak of colours when they are actually refering to pigments, what they are made of (various natural or synthetic substances), their relative permanence, etc. (Artlex.com)  was painted in the  styleA way of doing something. Use of materials, methods of working, design qualities and choice of subject matter reflect the style of the individual, culture, movement, or time period.  of  abstractImagery which departs from representational accuracy, to a variable range of possible degrees. Abstract artists select and then exaggerate or simplify the forms suggested by the world around them.  (Artlex.com)  expressionism. In the tradition of this movement, Lochhead uses a huge  canvasCommonly used as a support for oil or acrylic painting, canvas is a heavy woven fabric made of flax or cotton. Its surface is typically prepared for painting by priming with a ground. Linen — made of flax — is the standard canvas, very strong, sold by the roll and by smaller pieces. A less expensive alternative to linen is heavy cotton duck, though it is less acceptable (some find it unacceptable), cotton being less durable, because it's more prone to absorb dampness, and it's less receptive to grounds and size. For use in painting, a piece of canvas is stretched tightly by stapling or tacking it to a stretcher frame. A painting done on canvas and then cemented to a wall or panel is called marouflage. Canvas board is an inexpensive, commercially prepared cotton canvas which has been primed and glued to cardboard, suitable for students and amateurs who enjoy its portability. Also, a stretched canvas ready for painting, or a painting made on such fabric. Canvas is abbreviated c., and "oil on canvas" is abbreviated o/c.  (Artlex.com)  to communicate ideas related to feelings and emotion. The gestural marks created with the use of the  airbrushA precision spray gun attached by a hose to an electric air compressor (or other means of air pressure), or the use of this device to spray paints, dyes or inks. A great variety of spraying effects can be achieved using an airbrush, typically for very smooth applications or gradation of color. The use of airbrush is strongly associated with commercial art, in which it is often used in illustrations, in photographic retouching, and other types of painting. (Artlex.com)  or paint sprayer appear to be rapidly applied with spontaneously large arm movements. Painters who paint in the abstract  expressionistA manner of painting, drawing, sculpting, etc., in which forms derived from nature are distorted or exaggerated and colors are intensified for emotive or expressive purposes.  Also, a style of art developed in the 20th century, characterized chiefly by heavy, often black lines that define forms, sharply contrasting, often vivid colors, and subjective or symbolic treatment of thematic material.  tradition often experimented with non-traditional methods of  paintingWorks of art made with paint on a surface. Often the surface, also called a support, is either a tightly stretched piece of canvas or a panel. How the ground (on which paint is applied) is prepared on the support depends greatly on the type of paint to be used. Paintings are usually intended to be placed in frames, and exhibited on walls, but there have been plenty of exceptions. Also, the act of painting, which may involve a wide range of techniques and materials, along with the artist's other concerns which effect the content of a work. (Artlex.com)  and used large brushes, a paint sprayer or dripping or throwing the paint on the canvas. They appreciated the appearance of accident or chance even though their works were usually carefully planned before putting paint to canvas. Typically the abstract expressionists made no attempt to use  representationalTo stand for; symbolize. To depict or portray subjects a viewer may recognize as having a likeness; the opposite of abstraction. A representation is such a depiction. (Artlex.com)   subjectA topic or idea represented in an art work.  matter, but what was important to them was the expressive way the paint was applied.

start quoteIt's the play factor...
being able to play...end quote -- Ken Lochhead

Lochhead captured the essence of that experience in this artwork. The movement of the wind and the heat of the day are captured by Lochhead’s use of airbrushed  curvilinearFormed or characterized by curving lines. Elements of late Gothic and Art Nouveau ornament are examples of curvilinear treatment of form. Also curvilineal. (Artlex.com)  strokes and subdued colour. This light airy quality of this work is further enhanced by Lochhead’s placement of these spontaneous flowing marks along the side and top of the picture plane. He economically and abstractly used  lineA mark with length and direction(-s). An element of art which refers to the continuous mark made on some surface by a moving point. Types of line include: vertical, horizontal, diagonal, straight or ruled, curved, bent, angular, thin, thick or wide, interrupted (dotted, dashed, broken, etc.), blurred or fuzzy, controlled, freehand, parallel, hatching, meandering, and spiraling. Often it defines a space, and may create an outline or contour, define a silhouette; create patterns, or movement, and the illusion of mass or volume. It may be two-dimensional (as with pencil on paper) three-dimensional (as with wire) or implied (the edge of a shape or form). (Artlex.com)  and  colourProduced by light of various wavelengths, and when light strikes an object and reflects back to the eyes. Colour is an element of art with three properties: (1) hue or tint, the colour name, e.g., red, yellow, blue, etc.: (2) intensity, the purity and strength of a colour, e.g., bright red or dull red; and (3) value, the lightness or darkness of a colour. When the spectrum is organized as a color wheel, the colours are divided into groups called primary, secondary and intermediate (or tertiary) colours; analogous and complementary, and also as warm and cool colours. Colours can be objectively described as saturated, clear, cool, warm, deep, subdued, grayed, tawny, mat, glossy, monochrome, multicolored, particolored, variegated, or polychromed. Some words used to describe colours are more subjective (subject to personal opinion or taste), such as: exciting, sweet, saccharine, brash, garish, ugly, beautiful, cute, fashionable, pretty, and sublime. Sometimes people speak of colours when they are actually refering to pigments, what they are made of (various natural or synthetic substances), their relative permanence, etc. (Artlex.com)  to suggest air currents floating overhead in a beautifully clear and clean prairie sky.

 

additional resources Interview with Kate Davis - Ken Lochhead and the Regina Five
Duration: 2:43 min
Size: 11440kb
Interview with Timothy Long - The Regina Five
Duration: 2:30 min
Size: 11440kb
Things to Think About
  • What techniques do you think he used to achieve such soft edges on the lines? Can you think of other artists who use this technique? Discuss graffiti art and some of the arguments for and against it in your community.
Studio Activity

Spending time

The average person spends about three seconds in front of a painting.

  • Practise spending more time with an artwork.
  • Really try to observe what is presented and analyze what the artist intended.
  • Go to your local art gallery and observe the works on display.
  • Remember the exhibitions are constantly changing, so you will want to frequently check out what is new at the gallery.

Spraypainting

Practice using atomizers or spray cans to make flowing overlapping lines.


Abstraction

Ken Lochhead liked to break all the rules and create his own unique works.

Make your own unique  abstractImagery which departs from representational accuracy, to a variable range of possible degrees. Abstract artists select and then exaggerate or simplify the forms suggested by the world around them.  (Artlex.com)   paintingWorks of art made with paint on a surface. Often the surface, also called a support, is either a tightly stretched piece of canvas or a panel. How the ground (on which paint is applied) is prepared on the support depends greatly on the type of paint to be used. Paintings are usually intended to be placed in frames, and exhibited on walls, but there have been plenty of exceptions. Also, the act of painting, which may involve a wide range of techniques and materials, along with the artist's other concerns which effect the content of a work. (Artlex.com)  based on the idea of a place or landscape.

References

Author unknown.  ‘Regina Five artist dies.’  CBC.ca, Tuesday, July 18, 2006.  Retrieved from the Internet on August 9, 2008 from:  http://www.cbc.ca/arts/story/2006/07/18/lochhead-ken-obit.html

Fraser, Ted. R.L. Bloore, Sixteen Years. 1958-1974.  Exhibition catalogue.  The Art Gallery of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario, 1975.

KennethLochhead.com.  Retrieved from the Internet on August 9, 2008 from:  http://www.kennethlochhead.com/index_1.html

Canadian Heritage University of Regina Mackenzie Art Gallery Mendel Art Gallery Sask Learning