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The Anatomy of a Saskatchewan Saskatoon: Pie in the Sky
watercolour, eleven part series,pie in the sky, anatomy, anthology, cycles, process of art-making, evolution of an idea, drawings of the Saskatoon plant, saskatoon berry, saskatoon pie, spaceship, outer space,community, perspective, artist's perspective,life cycle, artwork series, art-making process, colour, berries, pie-making,space, outer space, depth, tonal value, watercolourist, drawing, watercolour painting,sky, pie, food, dessert food, slice of pie,
description

The eleven-part Anatomy of a Saskatchewan Saskatoon: Pie in the Sky is an anthology of process, idea and aesthetics. Here we have a work, rendered as a  seriesA number of things or events standing or succeeding in order, and connected by a like relation; sequence; order; course; a succession of things; as, a continuous series of calamitous events. (The Online Plain Text English Dictionary)  but which, [unlike the seven-part Growth Cycle,] is intended to illustrate both the process of art making and the evolution of an idea. The Anatomy series starts out simply enough with drawings of the Saskatoon plant complete with notations. The second piece shows the introduction of colour, and the beginnings of the evolution of the saskatoon reminiscent of the earlier cycles. The pie, with baking instructions, appears in part three. The berry, it seems, has no finer goal in the mind of the artist than to find its way into a pie. Parts four and five are pivotal works, for once the pie is complete it immediately departs from the realm of the commonplace; it becomes a pie in the sky…The remainder of the series shows the pie, which has now become a type of spaceship, departing for unknown regions in outer space with the location of Saskatoon being marked by a saskatoon. The tonal variations and depth of the blue of outer space in the final three works in the series reveal Kriekle the watercolourist. (Zepp, 1984)

For Kriekle, Anatomy of a Saskatoon - Pie in the Sky is a series about the process of observing, imagining and composing. On one level, it explores the elements of  paintingWorks of art made with paint on a surface. Often the surface, also called a support, is either a tightly stretched piece of canvas or a panel. How the ground (on which paint is applied) is prepared on the support depends greatly on the type of paint to be used. Paintings are usually intended to be placed in frames, and exhibited on walls, but there have been plenty of exceptions. Also, the act of painting, which may involve a wide range of techniques and materials, along with the artist's other concerns which effect the content of a work. (Artlex.com)  - the tools, ideas, drawings, colours, compositions and perspectives. On another level, it is a progression of vantage points and focus. The Saskatoon berry symbolizes the seed and its dominant possibility of new life. It is both an ingredient in the pies, to our physical nourishment and delight, and a  symbolVisual image that represents something else.  of illusion. The sky is another vantage point, looking down upon the city of Saskatoon - a community of people and energy - seeds planted on the earth. The earth is a seed in space."  (Kriekle, 1984)

start quoteI'm interested again in skies in a number of ways. Maybe this is the large colour-field painter coming out in me...end quote -- Donna Kriekle

In The Anatomy of a Saskatchewan Saskatoon: Pie in the Sky and many of her other works, Kreikle is interested in the life cycle. She shows not only the life cycle of the saskatoon berry in this work but also of the painting itself. She does this by including numerous recipe cards or snapshots of the process she used in the  compositionArrangements of elements in a work of art.  and construction of this work. Recipes, ingredients and techniques for both are included in the delicate drawings and paintings she subtly includes in the background areas. Kriekle moves from  lineA mark with length and direction(-s). An element of art which refers to the continuous mark made on some surface by a moving point. Types of line include: vertical, horizontal, diagonal, straight or ruled, curved, bent, angular, thin, thick or wide, interrupted (dotted, dashed, broken, etc.), blurred or fuzzy, controlled, freehand, parallel, hatching, meandering, and spiraling. Often it defines a space, and may create an outline or contour, define a silhouette; create patterns, or movement, and the illusion of mass or volume. It may be two-dimensional (as with pencil on paper) three-dimensional (as with wire) or implied (the edge of a shape or form). (Artlex.com)  drawings on white paper in her first  drawingDepiction of shapes and forms on a surface chiefly by means of lines. Colour and shading may be included. A major fine art technique in itself, drawing is the basis of all pictorial representation, and an early step in most art activities. Though an integral part of most painting, drawing is generally differentiated from painting by the dominance of line over mass. There are many sorts of drawing techniques, varying according to the effect the artist wants, and depending on whether the drawing is an end in itself — an independent and finished work of art -- or a preliminary to some other medium or form — although distinct from the final product, such drawings also have intrinsic artistic value. Preliminary drawings include various exercises (e.g., contour drawing, gesture drawing, figure drawing, drawing from the flat), as well as sketches and studies, cartoons and underdrawings. (Artlex.com)  to a rich strong solid  colourProduced by light of various wavelengths, and when light strikes an object and reflects back to the eyes. Colour is an element of art with three properties: (1) hue or tint, the colour name, e.g., red, yellow, blue, etc.: (2) intensity, the purity and strength of a colour, e.g., bright red or dull red; and (3) value, the lightness or darkness of a colour. When the spectrum is organized as a color wheel, the colours are divided into groups called primary, secondary and intermediate (or tertiary) colours; analogous and complementary, and also as warm and cool colours. Colours can be objectively described as saturated, clear, cool, warm, deep, subdued, grayed, tawny, mat, glossy, monochrome, multicolored, particolored, variegated, or polychromed. Some words used to describe colours are more subjective (subject to personal opinion or taste), such as: exciting, sweet, saccharine, brash, garish, ugly, beautiful, cute, fashionable, pretty, and sublime. Sometimes people speak of colours when they are actually refering to pigments, what they are made of (various natural or synthetic substances), their relative permanence, etc. (Artlex.com)  in her final cosmic image. The series becomes like a  metaphorUsed in art as in speech. A term, regularly used for one object, is used for another and suggests a likeness between to the two.  for birth, life and ultimately death as the pie fades and becomes one with the dark  watercolourAny paint that uses water as a solvent. Paintings done with this medium are known as watercolours. What carries the pigment in watercolour (called its medium, vehicle, or base) is gum arabic. An exception to this rule is water miscible oil paints, which employ water as their solvent, but are actually oil paints. Colours are usually applied and spread with brushes, but other tools can also used. The most common techniques for applying watercolour are called wet-on-dry and wet-on-wet, along with the dry brush techniques dry-on-dry and dry-on-wet. Colours can be removed while still wet, to various degrees by blotting. Most watercolour painting is done on paper, but other absorbent grounds can also be employed. The papers most favored by those who paint with watercolour is white, very thick, with high rag content, and has some tooth. (Artlex.com)  washes of the universe.

 

additional resources About Anatomy of a Saskatchewan Saskatoon Pie in the Sky
Duration: 4:02 min
Size: 6546kb
On Her Sky Series
Duration: 2:01 min
Size: 3284kb
On the Relationship Between Art and Play
Duration: 1:52 min
Size: 3070kb
On What Got Her Started in Art
Duration: 2:35 min
Size: 4270kb
Things to Think About
  • Donna Kriekle says that anyone can be an artist. It is more about determination than it is about talent. She believes you need interest and work ethic. Discuss this idea with fellow artists, students and teachers.
  • Could Kriekle be referring to how small and insignificant we are within the vast universe? How could "the earth be a seed in space"?
Studio Activity

Pie in the sky

In Anatomy of a Saskatchewan Saskatoon: Pie in the Sky, Donna Kriekle presents a  paintingWorks of art made with paint on a surface. Often the surface, also called a support, is either a tightly stretched piece of canvas or a panel. How the ground (on which paint is applied) is prepared on the support depends greatly on the type of paint to be used. Paintings are usually intended to be placed in frames, and exhibited on walls, but there have been plenty of exceptions. Also, the act of painting, which may involve a wide range of techniques and materials, along with the artist's other concerns which effect the content of a work. (Artlex.com)  of a particular kind of berry that is used to make jams and pies.

  • Think of an activity like pie making.
  • Illustrate the production or making of the objects involved.

Have an "eat your art" day

  • Bring something creative you have made in the kitchen to your class.
  • Document your creation by drawing and painting small watercolours before consuming the works.

Draw plants growing

Watercolour

Portraits

Donna Kriekle paints portraits of her family for her own purposes. Draw or paint a member of your family or community.

References

Kriekle, Donna.  ‘Artist Statement.’ in Donna Kriekle: Artists with Their Work.  Exhibition catalogue.  Norman MacKenzie Art Gallery, Regina, Saskatchewan, 1984.

Zepp, Norman.  Donna Kriekle: Artists with Their Work.  Exhibition catalogue.  Norman MacKenzie Art Gallery, Regina, Saskatchewan, 1984.

Canadian Heritage University of Regina Mackenzie Art Gallery Mendel Art Gallery Sask Learning