Stanley Ellis Day

About the Artist

Day was born in Yakima, Washington, in 1933. He studied at institutions in his home state, and moved to Saskatchewan in 1960. He was an assistant professor of Education and assistant professor of Art at the University of Saskatchewan, and later became head of the Faculty of Fine Arts. He also served on the Saskatchewan Arts Board in 1968.

Stanley Day is known for his use of bold, strong colours and the  interplayMutual action or influence; interaction; as, the interplay of affection. (The Online Plain Text English Dictionary)  of images and surfaces in his works. In an interview given in 1976, Day talked about his use of  colourProduced by light of various wavelengths, and when light strikes an object and reflects back to the eyes. Colour is an element of art with three properties: (1) hue or tint, the colour name, e.g., red, yellow, blue, etc.: (2) intensity, the purity and strength of a colour, e.g., bright red or dull red; and (3) value, the lightness or darkness of a colour. When the spectrum is organized as a color wheel, the colours are divided into groups called primary, secondary and intermediate (or tertiary) colours; analogous and complementary, and also as warm and cool colours. Colours can be objectively described as saturated, clear, cool, warm, deep, subdued, grayed, tawny, mat, glossy, monochrome, multicolored, particolored, variegated, or polychromed. Some words used to describe colours are more subjective (subject to personal opinion or taste), such as: exciting, sweet, saccharine, brash, garish, ugly, beautiful, cute, fashionable, pretty, and sublime. Sometimes people speak of colours when they are actually refering to pigments, what they are made of (various natural or synthetic substances), their relative permanence, etc. (Artlex.com)  in his paintings and wooden reliefs, as well as about the importance to him of colours in relationship to each other saying:

You know, I don’t even think about my work being happy, and many people have made reference to the fact that the work is a kind of joyous experience for them.  I don’t regard it one way or the other. I just love colours, exploring the relations between colours…In the back of my mind I am always seeking simplicity, but I seek it in a complicated way…I like rich colours. I like lots of colour, but each  colourProduced by light of various wavelengths, and when light strikes an object and reflects back to the eyes. Colour is an element of art with three properties: (1) hue or tint, the colour name, e.g., red, yellow, blue, etc.: (2) intensity, the purity and strength of a colour, e.g., bright red or dull red; and (3) value, the lightness or darkness of a colour. When the spectrum is organized as a color wheel, the colours are divided into groups called primary, secondary and intermediate (or tertiary) colours; analogous and complementary, and also as warm and cool colours. Colours can be objectively described as saturated, clear, cool, warm, deep, subdued, grayed, tawny, mat, glossy, monochrome, multicolored, particolored, variegated, or polychromed. Some words used to describe colours are more subjective (subject to personal opinion or taste), such as: exciting, sweet, saccharine, brash, garish, ugly, beautiful, cute, fashionable, pretty, and sublime. Sometimes people speak of colours when they are actually refering to pigments, what they are made of (various natural or synthetic substances), their relative permanence, etc. (Artlex.com)  has to relate to another in a particular situation. (‘Day free of restrictions’, Saskatoon Star Phoenix, November 5, 1976.)


On Stanley Ellis Day
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