Luke Lindoe

About the Artist

Luke Orton Lindoe was born in Bashaw, Alberta, in 1913. He studied at the Alberta College of Art and Design and then the Ontario of College of Art and Design. From 1947 to 1957 he was an instructor at the Alberta College of Art, where he developed the  ceramicsPottery or hollow clay sculpture fired at high temperatures in a kiln or oven to make them harder and stronger. Types include earthenware, porcelain, stoneware, and terra cotta. (Artlex.com)  department. Lindoe is credited with helping to establish many professional potters and  ceramicPottery or hollow clay sculpture fired at high temperatures in a kiln or oven to make them harder and stronger. Types include earthenware, porcelain, stoneware, and terra cotta. (Artlex.com)  artists in Alberta. He left the College after 10 years because the institution “was using students to further the image of the people running the school,” he charged. (Regina Leader-Post, 1983)

Lindoe then became research director for the Medicine Hat Brick and Tile Company before forming his own company, Plainsman Clays, in 1964. Plainsman continues to supply high quality clays to potters and ceramic artists across Canada and in the United States.

A visitor to Lindoe’s Medicine Hat studio described it as looking more like a research scientist’s laboratory than an artist’s quarters.  Throughout his life Lindoe continued to research the qualities of clay, describing his research work as using “imagination to lead raw materials into a product. This is just as rewarding as the art role. Creativity isn’t limited to art,” he said.

Lindoe is one of the pioneers in commissioned murals in Canada. His  concreteIn art criticism, concrete refers to things which are real, particular, tangible; as opposed to abstract. The more general use of the term refers to the concrete building material, which is extremely heavy and durable when set. First employed by the ancient Romans, it's made from a mixture of Portland cement, aggregate (typically sand and gravel), and water. Concrete is typically poured into a form; very rarely modeled or carved. Slabs should be between four and eight inches thick, depending on their function. A basement floor: 4 inches; home garage floor or porch: 4-6; sidewalk: 5-6: driveway: 6-8. Concrete is sold by cubic volume. Calculate need as: slab thickness in feet x slab width in feet x slab length in feet = cubic feet of concrete. 27 cubic feet = 1 cubic yard. Large projects require steel reinforcing bars (called re-bar). The strength of concrete increases when the amount of cement in the mixture increases, the amount of water relative to cement decreases, the density of the concrete is higher, and the aggregate is coarser. (Artlex.com)   reliefsA type of sculpture in which forms projects from a background. There are three degrees or types of relief: high, low, and sunken. In high relief, the forms stand far out from the background. In low relief (best known as bas-relief), they are shallow. In sunken relief, also called hollow or intaglio; the backgrounds are not cut back and the points in highest relief are level with the original surface of the material being carved. (Artlex.com)  are incorporated in St. Mary’s Cathedral in Calgary, Alberta, and a  limestoneStone composed mainly of calcium carbonate, much of it sedimentary rock and formed by fossil deposits. Marble is actually a limestone that can be polished. (Artlex.com)   reliefA type of sculpture in which forms projects from a background. There are three degrees or types of relief: high, low, and sunken. In high relief, the forms stand far out from the background. In low relief (best known as bas-relief), they are shallow. In sunken relief, also called hollow or intaglio; the backgrounds are not cut back and the points in highest relief are level with the original surface of the material being carved. (Artlex.com)  adorns an outside wall of the Royal Alberta Museum in Edmonton. Lindoe is known internationally as a  ceramicPottery or hollow clay sculpture fired at high temperatures in a kiln or oven to make them harder and stronger. Types include earthenware, porcelain, stoneware, and terra cotta. (Artlex.com)  artist, having exhibited throughout North America, in Europe and Japan, and his work is held in many private and public collections.

“I have never walked through the mainstream of art; I am content as an observer who has learned to share.” (Luke Lindoe, 1992)


Canadian Heritage University of Regina Mackenzie Art Gallery Mendel Art Gallery Sask Learning