Eleanor Bond

About the Artist

Eleanor Bond was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba in 1948, and graduated from the School of Art at the University of Manitoba in 1976. In addition to visual art, Bond has pursued studies in several other areas including English literature, comparative religion and interior design. She also has a particular interest in the  built environmentSee Wikipedia for information on built environments:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Built_environment  and public space. This is evident in her paintings and drawings, where she explores the impact of technological developments and urban  designA plan, or to plan. The organization or composition of a work; the skilled arrangement of its parts. An effective design is one in which the elements of art and principles of design have been combined to achieve an overall sense of unity. Also [applied design], the production of attractive and well crafted functional objects. Subcategories of the design arts include: architecture, bonsai, fashion design, furniture design, graphic design, ikebana, industrial design, interior design, landscape architecture, stagecraft, textile design, and Web page design. (Artlex.com)  on humans and animals, and reflects on current ideas of space, place and community.

Bond produces large canvases that represent the city, but she chooses unusual perspectives that threaten to give the viewer a sense of vertigo, or a case of dizziness (to see some examples, go to Eleanor Bond at the Art History Archive. Her cityscapes are familiar to us, but at the same time they have a strong sense of unreality about them. Bond compounds this feeling of unreality by  paintingWorks of art made with paint on a surface. Often the surface, also called a support, is either a tightly stretched piece of canvas or a panel. How the ground (on which paint is applied) is prepared on the support depends greatly on the type of paint to be used. Paintings are usually intended to be placed in frames, and exhibited on walls, but there have been plenty of exceptions. Also, the act of painting, which may involve a wide range of techniques and materials, along with the artist's other concerns which effect the content of a work. (Artlex.com)  primarily in black and white, with just a few hints of colour, giving her fictitious cityscapes a sleek, futuristic quality.

While Bond gives us a kind of bird's-eye  perspectiveA method used to create the illusion of space on a two-dimensional surface. It can be created by overlapping, placement, detail, colour, converging lines and size. See HandPrint.com (http://www.handprint.com/HP/WCL/perspect3.html and http://www.handprint.com/HP/WCL/perspect4.html) for some examples.  on the cityscapes she creates, she limits our  perspectiveA method used to create the illusion of space on a two-dimensional surface. It can be created by overlapping, placement, detail, colour, converging lines and size. See HandPrint.com (http://www.handprint.com/HP/WCL/perspect3.html and http://www.handprint.com/HP/WCL/perspect4.html) for some examples.  to the familiar  gridA framework or pattern of criss-crossed or parallel lines. A lattice. When criss-crossed, lines are conventionally horizontal and vertical; and when lines are diagonal, they are usually at right angles to each other. Typically graph paper is a grid of lines. Things which are often gridded: tiles, tessellations, wire screens, chess boards, maps, graphs, charts, calendars, and modern street plans. (Artlex.com)  of urban streets, buildings and spaces. There is no horizon that our eyes can escape to for relief from the sense of unreality in her vision of the city. This adds to the sense that her cities are claustrophobic places where life is compressed or limited by the very technologies that have made the modern city possible.

Bond's cityscapes, then, have no area code, but they also are not entirely works of fiction. The cities in her paintings exist somewhere in-between reality and illusion, reflecting the tensions that exist in  contemporaryCurrent, belonging to the same period of time. Usually referring to our present time, but can refer to being current with any specified time. (Artlex.com)  cities. Bond seems to be saying that technology makes the amenities of the modern city possible, but at a cost to humanity's need for connections with nature and each other.


Canadian Heritage University of Regina Mackenzie Art Gallery Mendel Art Gallery Sask Learning